450

I read an interesting article on NPR ( National Public Radio) on the question of whether South Korea’s sexual education guidelines blames those who have been date rape victims. Despite the fact that there are low crime rates in South Korea, there is no escape that gender equality is very poor in South Korea and sadly sexual violence is on the rise. Back in August I wrote a post based on a study coming out of the KOREAN INSTITUTE OF CRIMINOLOGY, which conducted a study on the issue of whether Korean men using violence against their romantic partners is an issue in the country. The results are quite alarming with:

*1,593 (79.7%) admitting that they had abused their girlfriend during the dating period. The sample size was 2000 who participated. 

* 71% of those surveyed stated that they also controlled the activities their girlfriends partook in – and this includes restricting them from meeting and hanging out with friends and family members.

These are quite serious numbers and NPR does a great look into what is actually taught in sexual education classes for young Koreans. In March 2015, Korea’s Education Ministry released updated sex education curriculum guidelines for public schools. The Korean Herald were privy to the full manuals which were released. It included a statement which said that:

WOMEN NOT PAYING FOR THEIR MEALS IS A POSSIBLE REASON FOR DATE RAPE.


Here is the exact wording:

“From the perspective of a man who spends a lot of money on dates, it is natural that he would want a commensurate compensation from the woman. In such conditions, unwanted date rape can occur,” 

Here are some other statements which have been pulled from the manual (via NPR):

Tips to respond to sexual harassment, also for the high school-level curriculum, include “step on his foot as if by mistake.”

The manual for teachers of elementary-age students includes the statement that “male sexual desire can arise quickly on impulse, regardless of time and place.”

The Korean Herald has been quick to respond to seek that these guidelines be removed or amended at the time. This was responded by the Ministry with a no basically. 2 years on NPR asked the Ministry whether things will change and here is their response:

“There were a lot of complaints about what we had mentioned,” a spokesperson for the Education Ministry tells NPR. “For the past two years, we looked through the guidelines to see if there were any improvements to be made, but the result that we reached last September is that there are no particular official changes to be made. We’ve recommended these guidelines to be followed this school year as well.”

Looks like nothing will change. Now I am not saying that ALL Asian countries are sexist and misogynistic. Every country worldwide has this problem. But we really need to get a hold of the issues around sexual harassment and assault against women, and in Asia which is still largely a patriarchal society this is still not controlled. I am glad to see media and counselling groups taking it to the Government for change, let’s see if anything else happens.

Images via NPR

To read the full article, please click on: South Korea’s Sex Ed Guidelines Suggest Victims Are To Blame For Date Rape

0 Comments